Historical Archive?—?Cloud Camp?—?September 2008

Adrian Cockcroft

September 2008 [I found this in an archive and thought it was worth sharing 10 years on. 30 mins) Closing Remarks: 9:40 pm (10 mins) Let’s Party 9:50 pm (40 mins) Date : Tuesday, September 30, 2008 from 06:00 PM?—?10:00 Historical Archive?—?Cloud Cloud Camp?—?September

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2019 Open Source Database Report: Top Databases, Public Cloud vs. On-Premise, Polyglot Persistence

High Scalability

Ready to transition from a commercial database to open source, and want to know which databases are most popular in 2019? Wondering whether an on-premise vs. public cloud vs. hybrid cloud infrastructure is best for your database strategy? Or, considering adding a new database to your application and want to see which combinations are most popular?

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2019 PostgreSQL Trends Report: Private vs. Public Cloud, Migrations, Database Combinations & Top Reasons Used

High Scalability

PostgreSQL is an open source object-relational database system that has soared in popularity over the past 30 years from its active, loyal, and growing community. For the 2nd year in a row, PostgreSQL has kept the title of #1 fastest growing database in the world according to the DBMS of the Year report by the experts at DB-Engines. So what makes PostgreSQL so special, and how is it being used today?

Agile Made Us Better, but We Signed Up for Great

The Agile Manager

This content is derived from material presented in a ThoughtWorks-sponsored webcast in June 2008. A two minute video presentation of this material is available. A complete webinar re-broadcast, including audience Q&A, will be available soon. The popular press makes Agile sound like nirvana. Practitioners speak of it in nearly religious terms. Yet we often find that IT teams are underwhelmed after going “Agile,” even after having expended considerable effort on making the change.

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Agile Readiness Assessment Webinar - 19 September

The Agile Manager

Registration details: Friday, 19 September 2008 Time: 1:00pm Eastern Standard Time (US-New York, GMT-4:00) Registration URL: [link]. Please join me on Friday, 19 September for An Agile Readiness Assessment , a ThoughtWorks sponsored webinar. Taking on Agile can appear to be an overwhelming commitment with no obvious place to start. For one thing, Agile is often a significant departure from how a team is operating, requiring organisational changes, new practices, and stricter discipline.

Manageable CSS with CSSDOC

Tim Kadlec

It reflects * the composition of colors through the years of the * customers project as well as the boldness it implies. * * @project Big Little Homepage * @version 0.2.8 * @package xhtml-css * @author Mina Margin * @copyright 2008 by the author * @cssdoc version 1.0-pre * @license GPL v3 * * @colordef #fff; white * @colordef #808080; standard grey */. I’ve been very interested in finding better ways to create CSS stylesheets that are easy to navigate, understand and maintain.

The Agile PMO - Real Time Metrics and Visibility Webinar - 5 November

The Agile Manager

Registration Details: The Agile PMO - Real Time Metrics and Visibility Wednesday, 5 November 2008 Time: 12:00pm Eastern Standard Time (US-New York, GMT-5:00) Registration URL: [link]. There’s a lot riding on IT in the current economic climate. In tight times, businesses rely on efficiency, and IT investments will be expected to create a lot of that efficiency. But while IT assets may help the business tighten up, IT execution must also tighten up to match the times.

Exploring Cross Document Communication

Tim Kadlec

One of the new features that HTML5 offers web developers is a way to send information between documents on different sites via Javascript. Currently for security and privacy reasons, browsers prevent cross site scripting but with HTML5’s Cross Document Messaging, the intention is to allow documents to communicate with each other without sacrificing security. To experiment with these methods and events, you’ll need to be running either IE8, Firefox 3 or the WebKit Nightlies.

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The PMO Divide

The Agile Manager

This content is derived from a webinar I presented earlier this month titled The Agile PMO: Real-Time Metrics and Visibility. This is the first of a multi-part series. We’ve all seen it: the project that reports “green” status on its stop-and- go light report for months suddenly goes red in the late stages of development. This is nothing new to IT, as projects suddenly crater all the time. But it begs the question: why does this happen as often as it does?

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Rules Versus Principles

The Agile Manager

Treasury Panels Lay Out Hedge Fund `Best Practices' Bloomberg.com, 15 April 2008. Mortgage Fallout Exposes Holes in New Bank-Risk Rules The Wall Street Journal, 4 March 2008. In the wake of a credit market seizure, illiquid investments, $245 billion of write-downs and losses 1 , collapsing funds and financial institutions, and no indication as to where it’s going to end, US capital markets are facing significant changes in how they're regulated. Hedge funds are a flashpoint.

Microsoft Gives Microformats a Little Oomph!

Tim Kadlec

Historically, it hasn’t been very often that I’ve been able to tip my hat to Microsoft for open web innovation. Today though is one of those times that I get to do so. John Allsopp, one of Microformats’s biggest supporters, mentioned today that Microsoft’s designer/developer community, Mix Online , has developed a IE toolbar called Oomph.

Font Equality for Everyone

Tim Kadlec

One of the areas that web design is lacking in, is a way to reliably provide beautiful fonts for our designs. There’s a very limited amount of fonts that are actually safe to use on the web, because not everyone is a designer with lots of nice fonts installed on their machine. Sure, with font stacking we can help ease the pain a bit, but it’s still a small amount of people that will see the fonts we intend, with everyone else getting boring alternates.

Book Review: Mobile Web Development

Tim Kadlec

Who Wrote It? Mobile Web Development is written by Nirav Mehta, the head of Magnet Technologies a software development firm in India. He blogs about a variety of business and tech topics at www.mehtanirav.com. What’s Covered? Mobile Web Development covers a wide variety of topics related to…guess what… mobile web development.

The Canvas Element: Starting to Draw

Tim Kadlec

Last time around , we took a general look at the canvas element and how it is supported (or not) in various browsers. This time, we’ll start to go into the element in a bit more detail and start to look at some the things we can do with it. A Quick Look at Attributes. We’ve already seen how to set up the canvas element in HTML: You’ve probably noticed that we’ve included an id attribute on our canvas element to make it easier for us to access the element in our Javascript.

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Getting Started with the Canvas Element

Tim Kadlec

There’s a lot of really exciting and interesting features arriving just around the corner in the world of web development. One of the new features that is receiving a lot of attention, and for good reason, is the new canvas element. The canvas element offers a lot of power to web developers, but can take a bit for some people to get comfortable with. So, I’m going to run a series of posts introducing this powerful new feature, and showing some of the ways it can be utilized.

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Living In Harmony

Tim Kadlec

The big news in the Javascript community for the last week has been the announcement of ECMAScript Harmony. A lot of news is really just overblown, but this is a big development, and one that any Javascript developer should be following. Some Background. There’s been a lot of talk in the Javascript community over the past 9 years or so about the development of ECMAScript 4, what was to be the foundation for what was being called Javascript 2.

Undermining the Industry

Tim Kadlec

It’s no secret that the web design industry is often not given the respect it deserves. People treat it as if it’s a much simpler task than it really is. Forgive me if I come off sounding a bit arrogant, but it seems like people seriously underestimate the work involved in creating a quality web site. One issue, for example, is people expecting to see comps of work without payment. It happens quite a bit, but it’s a ridiculous request.

New Way to Store Custom Data

Tim Kadlec

There’s a lot of interesting new features being suggested for HTML5 and XHTML2. Some of them are extremely useful, some of them seem to be more questionable additions. One feature being implemented in HTML5 that I do like is the addition of custom data attributes to HTML elements. Manage Your Data.

Excuses, Excuses

Tim Kadlec

I did what I said I told myself I would never do…I only posted one item the entire month. I always told myself that if I was going to have a blog going, I was going to commit to it and ensure that the blog never went stale…there would always be fresh content on my site. I think I may have underestimated the wonderful curves that life throws out there! I do have what I feel are a few fairly good excuses for being quiet lately.

Introducing alphaITjournal.com

The Agile Manager

alpha IT journal.com I'm pleased to announce the launch of alphaITjournal.com , an online magazine focused on the execution, management and governance of IT investments that can produce outsized (or "alpha") returns. The mission and purpose are summarised in the welcome message on the site and in the press release that was issued in early July. There are a few things that I hope stand out about the site. The first is the site layout.

Improving Web-Ed

Tim Kadlec

One topic that I have been interested in for quite some time now is secondary education when it comes to web development and design. It is a very unfortunate truth that when it comes to web development, the curriculum is in serious need of some help. As a recently graduated student, I can reflect on both my training and the training of other people my age who attended other colleges for web development that I interacted with.

Elsewhere on the Web

Tim Kadlec

Test Driven Development. There was a nice article at Sitepoint about Test Driven Development. The author, Chris Corbyn, walks through the TDD process using PHP examples, and describes some of the benefits he has discovered in the TDD process. Firefox 3 Memory Benchmarks and Comparison. With both Firefox 3 and Opera 9.5 being freshly released, here’s a nice memory performance comparison of those browsers, as well as the IE Beta version 1 and Flock.

A Better Way To Globalize

Tim Kadlec

Lately I’ve been working quite a bit with some PHP code that made heavy use of global variables. It made the code quite rigid to work with…when changes were made in one function it had a ripple effect on many other key functions and more than once, made me curse global scope. But sometimes it’s necessary to share information between different functions, so what’s a programmer to do? Global variables certainly make that possible, but they also create some problems.

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Javascript: The Good Parts

Tim Kadlec

Who Wrote It? When I first heard Douglas Crockford was writing Javascript: The Good Parts (let’s just call it JTGP from here on out) I was anxiously awaiting the release. Crockford has been responsible for many highly regarded articles and presentations, as well as for his incredible work with JSON, JSLint and much more. While Brendan Eich may be the father of Javascript, Crockford is probably the Godfather.

The Moral Hazard of IT projects

The Agile Manager

The longer an IT project is expected to take, the greater the risk of moral hazard : i.e., that IT will provide poor information to its business partners or have incentive to take unusual risks to complete delivery. This is not borne of maliciousness. People on an IT project are not necessarily out to defraud anybody. It may simply be that people incompletely scope the work, make assumptions about skills and capabilities, or are overly optimistic in estimates.

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Libraries and Frameworks

Tim Kadlec

A question I get asked often through emails and other discussions is how I feel about frameworks and libraries, both for scripting and for CSS. I’ve been meaning to share my thoughts on it for awhile, and now that I see NetTuts.com has posted an article about choosing a CSS framework, I figured now is as good a time as any. Any of you who have been reading my site since the beginning might remember I wrote a post about the importance of forcing yourself to reinvent the wheel.

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Behavior in Your Presentation

Tim Kadlec

I’ve spent some time lately playing around with the WebKit Nightly Build. In addition to having advanced CSS support, the nightly build also introduces a few new proprietary CSS properties (though the plan is to eventually get W3C to implement them in the CSS specification). There are some really cool features being implemented, including CSS gradients, masks and transforms. One new feature, CSS transitions, has me a little on the fence though. CSS transitions are definitely a cool idea.

Elsewhere on the Web

Tim Kadlec

line-height: abnormal. Eric Meyer has a great write-up about how diverse the rendering of line-height: normal is across browsers. Complete with a test page that allows you to see what happens to the value of line-height normal as different fonts and font-sizes are selected. What’s Next in jQuery and JavaScript. John Resig of jQuery fame posted a nice 11 minute video where he talks about what is coming up for jQuery, Javascript, and some changes that are being made in browsers.

Not As Clear As It Seems: CSS3 Opacity and RGBA

Tim Kadlec

One of the many things CSS lets us control is the opacity of elements, starting in CSS3. The opacity property is in fact one of the earliest and most widely implemented CSS3 properties. It has its problems though, but CSS3 also defines a more powerful way to control an element’s transparency: RGBA values. The Opacity Property. To change the opacity of an element using the opacity property, you simply give it a value between 0 and 1 to determine the elements’ opacity.

An Objective Look at Javascript 2.0: Strong Typing

Tim Kadlec

In our first look at the new features of Javascript 2.0, we will focus on the new typing system. We are just going to highlight some of the major changes and potential uses. For a more detailed look, take a look at the ECMAScript 4.0 Language Overview. Traditionally, Javascript is a loosely-typed language, meaning that variables are declared without a type. For example: `. var a = 42; // Number declaration. var b = “forty-two”; // String declaration. `.

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Phantom CSS

Tim Kadlec

At the heart of CSS, of course, are its selectors. They are after all what allow us to apply styles to a given element in our (X)HTML. Sometimes though, there is a desire to apply a style based on an elements state. That is where pseudo-classes come into play. You’ve probably all used them at some point…but there may be more there than you realize. Their value makes it worth taking a closer look. Static Pseudo-Classes.

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An Objective Look at Javascript 2.0: Looking Back

Tim Kadlec

There has been no shortage of debate over Javascript 2.0, based on ECMAScript 4.0. Some people are extremely excited about some of the new features being discussed, and some feel that Javascript 2.0 is shaping up to look a bit too much like Java or even C++ for their tastes.

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Spring Cleaning

Tim Kadlec

Overall, I’ve been quite happy with the feedback gotten about the site so far. It’s still quite young however, and therefore, there are a few changes that I thought needed to be made to help it continue to grow, and hopefully make it easier for readers to find and use the content here. For anyone interested, I thought I would highlight the changes. First off, I’ve increased the focus on past posts.

It’s Good to Be Wrong

Tim Kadlec

Being wrong is a good thing. I know…I know…we’ve been told our entire lives that it’s better to be right than wrong. I think, though, that in the design/development industry, it’s good to be wrong sometimes. Always being right means we’re not challenging ourselves enough. It means that either we’ve become comfortable and content with where we are at with our skills, or that there is no one challenging us to improve those skills.

Book Review: Pro JavaScript Design Patterns

Tim Kadlec

NOTE: This is the first book review to be featured here. The idea is that I will frequently review web-related books to hopefully help give you an idea of whether or not a book is right for you. The books reviewed will all be somehow related to web development or design so you will never hear me tell you how much I enjoyed Stephen King’s Dark Tower series or Napoleon’s Pyramids by William Dietrich… except for right now of course. Who Wrote It?

A Margin Call on Leveraged Time

The Agile Manager

IT is primarily a business of people solving problems during the creation of assets that increase Ebitda. Problem solving requires talent, and most IT organisations have to contend with a shortage of talented people. To some extent this reflects limitations of the labour market. It’s also economic: highly capable IT professionals aren’t inexpensive, and most firms struggle with budgets and costs.

More Manageable, Efficient Code Through 5S

Tim Kadlec

Sometimes code turns ugly. We add quick fixes or enhancements and our code starts to become a big tangle of functions that aren’t laid out in any sort of organized fashion. Over time, our code becomes bloated, difficult to maintain and what should be simple little fixes can quickly turn into long walks through messy syntax. One way of combating this is by implementing the 5S System. The 5S System is actually a Japanese improvement process originally developed for the manufacturing industry.

Hats Off To Opera

Tim Kadlec

Well that didn’t take long. It was just announced today that Opera’s developers have received the first 100 ⁄ 100 test score on the new Acid 3 test. There is apparently a small rendering glitch they still need to take care of, but this is really incredible progress considering the test was just formally announced on March 3rd.

Getting Started With ARIA

Tim Kadlec

Finding purely static websites today is becoming harder and harder. The line between website and web application blurs more and more as clients want more interactivity and real-time interaction on their site. This rich experience raises accessibility concerns though. To create a lot of these dynamic interfaces, we often have to use (X)HTML elements outside of their semantic meaning. For example, navigation is marked up using list-items.

Respecting What You Don't Understand

Tim Kadlec

While at SXSW, I had the privilege of attending a panel called Respect! During the panel, Jason Santa Maria made a comment that really struck me. He said that it’s “difficult to respect what I don’t understand” How very true. Respecting what we don’t understand is if not impossible then extremely hard to do. Without some sort of knowledge of the process and steps involved in arriving at the solution, how can we really respect the work required to make the solution?

Minimising the Speculative Risk of IT Investments

The Agile Manager

The cost of IT is often confused with its value. Consider earned value management : delivery, time and cost are combined in an attempt to better represent project performance. This might show the rate of cash burn to total expected effort by a development team, but it isn’t an indicator of value as the name might imply. This is simply another way to present cost. Cost is a measure of money out of pocket, whereas value is a measure of returns.

Quicker DOM Traversing with CSS Selectors

Tim Kadlec

After looking at XPath and how it can be used to quickly traverse the document tree, I also thought I’d take a look at the W3C Selectors API as it kind of falls in that same line. At this point, it none of the major browsers support it. However, any WebKit build (Safari’s engine) since February 7th supports it, and it looks like IE8 will be supporting it as well. I’d be eager to hear if anyone knows where Opera and Firefox stand on getting it going here in the future.

SXSW Anticipation and Twitter

Tim Kadlec

After having been signed up to attend since early October, it just dawned on me yesterday that I only have one full “work week” left until SXSW. This will be my first major web conference, and to say I am excited about going is a vast understatement. I believe my wife is probably looking forward to it as much as I am, if only for the fact that once it is over she no longer has to hear every little update from me about panel programming and new social events.